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Print, Photographic


Nom de l'objet : Print, Photographic
Catégorie de l'objet : Graphic Documents
Numéro d'accession : 2009.056.060
Date de début de production : 1815-01-01
Date de fin de production : 2007-12-31
Description : Black and white photo taken inside the Moir's Chocolate Factory, Woodside (Dartmouth) NS. Shows a large machine.
Commentaires : Moirs Limited was a chocolate manufacturing company that dates back to 1815 when Benjamin Moir arrived in Halifax from Scotland and founded a bread and cake bakery on the corner of Duke and Brunswick Street. When Benjamin died in 1845, his son William Moir took over the company. The bakery moved to a new five-storey building on Argyle Street in 1862 and added biscuits to its product line. In 1873, Williams son James Moir began experimenting with making sugar candy in the bakery; his confectionery creations proved so successful that candy was added to the Moirs product line. It was during this period that Moirs began to grow significantly as an organization. James Moir became company president in 1896 and in 1903, the company was formally incorporated as Moirs Limited. During this period, a paper box plant was added in Halifax and a chocolate refining plant and wooden box mill were built in Bedford, where the company acquired and developed its own hydro power facilities. In the early 1900s, the company produced 600 varieties of bread, cake, biscuits, and candies. Moirs flagship product, Pot of Gold chocolates, was created in 1928 with its iconic rainbow logo and marketing campaign establishing Moirs as the Maritimes largest manufacturer of box chocolates. In 1967, Standard Brands purchased Moirs Limited and the manufacturing plant was moved from Halifax to a new state-of-the-art facility in Woodside, Dartmouth in 1975. Here, the factory produced over 40,000 boxes of chocolates daily. Hershey acquired Moirs in 1987 as part of its acquisition of Nabisco Brands and it introduced the Pot of Gold brand to the U.S. market in 1996. As part of its plan to cut North American production costs, Hershey closed the Dartmouth plant in 2007, moving the Pot of Gold brand to a new plant in Monterrey, Mexico. The plants closure was attributed to a variety of factors, including the rising Canadian dollar, transportation costs, company restructuring, decreasing production capacity, and the lower wages available in Mexico. The plant officially closed its doors on December 21, 2007.  
Fonctions : Moirs Limited was a chocolate manufacturing company that dates back to 1815 when Benjamin Moir arrived in Halifax from Scotland and founded a bread and cake bakery on the corner of Duke and Brunswick Street. When Benjamin died in 1845, his son William Moir took over the company. The bakery moved to a new five-storey building on Argyle Street in 1862 and added biscuits to its product line. In 1873, Williams son James Moir began experimenting with making sugar candy in the bakery; his confectionery creations proved so successful that candy was added to the Moirs product line. It was during this period that Moirs began to grow significantly as an organization. James Moir became company president in 1896 and in 1903, the company was formally incorporated as Moirs Limited. During this period, a paper box plant was added in Halifax and a chocolate refining plant and wooden box mill were built in Bedford, where the company acquired and developed its own hydro power facilities. In the early 1900s, the company produced 600 varieties of bread, cake, biscuits, and candies. Moirs flagship product, Pot of Gold chocolates, was created in 1928 with its iconic rainbow logo and marketing campaign establishing Moirs as the Maritimes largest manufacturer of box chocolates. In 1967, Standard Brands purchased Moirs Limited and the manufacturing plant was moved from Halifax to a new state-of-the-art facility in Woodside, Dartmouth in 1975. Here, the factory produced over 40,000 boxes of chocolates daily. Hershey acquired Moirs in 1987 as part of its acquisition of Nabisco Brands and it introduced the Pot of Gold brand to the U.S. market in 1996. As part of its plan to cut North American production costs, Hershey closed the Dartmouth plant in 2007, moving the Pot of Gold brand to a new plant in Monterrey, Mexico. The plants closure was attributed to a variety of factors, including the rising Canadian dollar, transportation costs, company restructuring, decreasing production capacity, and the lower wages available in Mexico. The plant officially closed its doors on December 21, 2007.  
Établissement : Dartmouth Heritage Museum  Facebook-Dartmouth Heritage Museum  YouTube-Dartmouth Heritage Museum
Ville de l'établissement : Dartmouth
Province de l'établissement : Nova Scotia

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