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Lancet


Image - Lancet Image - Lancet
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Nom de l'objet : Lancet
Catégorie de l'objet : 5: T&E For Science & Technology
Sous-catégorie de l'objet : Medical & Psychological T&E
Discipline : Local History
Matériaux : Metal / Tortoiseshell
Numéro d'accession : 1961.027.022
Nom de la collection : First Nations, Sutton Collection
Fabricant : Cluley
District d'origine : Likely England
Culture : Canadian
Date de début de production : 1830
Date de fin de production : 1890
Description : CLULEY pocket-sized lancet with tortoiseshell cover, 19th-c Function: a lancet is a small surgical instrument, usually sharp-pointed and two-edged, and historically they were used for bloodletting and opening abscesses. When closed, the lancet is only 6 cm long. There is a short, tapered blade, which pivots out from a slim, pointed, tortoiseshell cover. The cover is very delicate. Near the join, the maker's name is impressed in the blade. Looks something like a "D" with a line bisecting it, and the word "CLULEY".
Commentaires : William Sutton (b. 1811-d. 1894) used this lancet for dental work, etc. when he and his wife Catharine Sutton worked as Methodist lay missionaries. William originally came from Hornecastle [or Betchford], Lincolnshire, England, and apprenticed as a shoemaker. He emigrated 1830 and married a young Ojibwa woman, Catharine Brown Sunego, at the Credit Indian Village mission in the Home District (the mission was near the Credit River), on Jan. 9, 1839. The Suttons lived at the Credit Village until 1845, when they moved northward to join the Newash Band of the Ojibwa on the west shore of Owen's Sound. The Suttons were Methodists and practiced missionary work at the Newash Mission. Mrs. Sutton and her heirs were granted a quantity of land by the Newash Band. The Suttons began improving this land for farming purposes. This area would later be known as Lots 32-33, Concession 3, Sarawak Twp., Grey County. In the 1850s, the Suttons practiced missionary work at Garden River for a time, but returned to their farm in 1857. Mrs. Sutton's mother and sister also lived nearby. The Newash people were relocated from the Newash Reserve to Cape Croker by the 1857 treaty. The name Newash is now more often seen spelt as "Nawash" (the Chippewas of Nawash), but in Mr. and Mrs. Sutton's day, it was spelt as "Newash" on maps and documents. Dr. Henry Manley was a medical doctor / surgeon who was appointed to provide medical assistance to the Newash. In the 19th-century, bloodletting was still an accepted medical practice, even though sustained blood loss could cause shock and harm or kill the patient. Lancets like this one were unsterilized and could cause septicemia (blood poisoning). As Listerism spread, surgical instruments eventually became all-metal, so that they could be effectively sterilized by chemicals (e.g. carbolic solution) or by autoclaving (c. 1876+). Obituary reads "The late Mr. William Sutton, one of the oldest and most respected residents of the township of Sarawak, in the County of Grey, passed away peacefully to his heavenly rest at his residence at Presque Isle, on January 5, 1894. Mr. Sutton was born at Betchford, Lincolnshire, England, on March 16, 1811. His parents were God-fearing people, and did all they could to train up their children in the fear of the Lord. Mr. Sutton left home at the early age of eleven years, for the purpose of learning a trade. At the age of nineteen, he left his native land, wishing to get away from parental restraint, and crossed the Atlantic, landing at Quebec on May 31, 1830. Having spent a few hours there he sailed for Prescott, where he worked at his trade of shoe-making for a time. While there a revival was commenced, the meetings were held from house to house, and the young Mr. Sutton, learning that the meeting was to be held at his boarding-house the next evening, tried to shun it, for he was apparently determined to resist every effort and influence that might lead him to Christ. He did his best to get away from the meeting that night, but through the interposition of God was hindered, and the consequence was that he was so deeply convicted by the Spirit of God that he found no peace till he surrendered himself to Christ, who has said "Come unto me and I will give you rest". Henceforth he was a true soldier of Christ and devoted himself to his service. He married in the year 1839 a lady by the name of Catharine Brown. They had a large family, but only three survived him. Mr. Sutton was for a time a missionary among the Indians; and was a local preacher in the Canada Methodist Church at the time of union in 1884. At that time he joined the Kemble Circuit and laboured as a local preacher on that circuit to the end. He was a very acceptable preacher among his own people. He preached also with much acceptance to the Presbyterians in Kemble and Sarawak. He was in the harness till the last, and died at the ripe age of eighty-two years and ten months, in the hope of a glorious resurrection. COM." - - - - CHRISTIAN GUARDIAN, June 13, 1894, p. 579.
Fonctions : William Sutton (b. 1811-d. 1894) used this lancet for dental work, etc. when he and his wife Catharine Sutton worked as missionaries. William originally came from Hornecastle [or Betchford], Lincolnshire, England, and apprenticed as a shoemaker. He emigrated at some point in the 1830s and became interested in becoming a missionary to the First Nations. He married a young Ojibwa woman, Catharine Brown Sunego, at the Credit Indian Village mission in the Home District, in January of 1839. The Credit Mission was located near the Credit River. The Suttons lived at the Credit Village until 1845, when they moved northward to join the Newash Band of the Ojibwa on the west shore of Owen's Sound. The Suttons were Methodists and practiced missionary work at the Newash Mission. Mrs. Sutton and her heirs were granted a quantity of land by the Newash Band, so the Suttons began improving her land for farming purposes. This area would later be known as Lots 32-33, Concession 3, Sarawak Twp., Grey County. In the 1850s, the Suttons practiced missionary work at Garden River for a time, but returned to their farm in 1857. In the 1860s, the Suttons continued to help Ojibwa people, and Mrs. Sutton travelled to England in 1860 order to obtain an audience with Queen Victoria in hopes of getting her to intercede with the Indian Department's poor treatment of aboriginals in Canada West. Mrs. Sutton passed away in Sarawak Twp. in September of 1865 and was buried on her property. Mr. Sutton continued to farm in Sarawak and preach in the area. Their farm land is now part of the Cobble Beach golf course in the municipality of Georgian Bluffs in Grey County, Ontario.
Longueur : 9.300
Largeur : 1.100
Profondeur : CLULEY pocket-sized lancet with tortoiseshell cover, 19th-c Function: a lancet is a small surgical instrument, usually sharp-pointed and two-edged, and historically they were used for bloodletting and opening abscesses. When closed, the lancet is only 6 cm long. There is a short, tapered blade, which pivots out from a slim, pointed, tortoiseshell cover. The cover is very delicate. Near the join, the maker's name is impressed in the blade. Looks something like a "D" with a line bisecting it, and the word "CLULEY".
Unité de mesure linéaire : cm
Translittération de l'inscription : CLULEY
Établissement : Grey Roots Museum & Archives
Ville de l'établissement : Owen Sound
Province de l'établissement : Ontario
Site web de l'établissement : http://www.greyroots.com   Facebook-Grey Roots Museum & Archives  Twitter-Grey Roots Museum & Archives  YouTube-Grey Roots Museum & Archives

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