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sewing table


Image - sewing table Image - sewing table Image - sewing table
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Nom de l'objet : sewing table
Catégorie de l'objet : Furnishings
Discipline : History
Matériaux : wood, yew
wood, oak
Numéro d'accession : 975 011
Date de fin de production : early 19th century
Description : Regency sewing table having a circular top rising to reveal a fitted interior, hung with a silk basket, upon three plain supports with a triform base and peg feet, painted with stylised garlands
Commentaires : Small work tables made for ladies to store their sewing materials and to sew on date from the late 18th century onwards."
source: Payne, Christopher, "Miller's Collecting Furniture". Reed International Books Limited, London, 1995, p.96.

"These were often gifts from parents or husband to the lady of the house and were regarded as her personal property. In this table, old letters, a book of devotions or poetry, pieces of treasured lace, and even jewellery mingled with the threads and thimbles amid the scent of potpourri."
source: Minhinnick, Jeanne, "At Home in Upper Canada". Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto, 1983, p.23.

Needlework was considered an essential skill of women well into the 20th century. Fine needlework was usually done by women who had a fair amount of leisure time during the day, as the tiny satin stitches (an over-and-over stitch) popular in Canada during the first half of the 19th century would have been difficult to accomplish by candlelight. Silks and satins, used for embroidery and sometimes stamped with a design, were available in stores in York since the beginning of the 19th century.
Young women often worked a sampler as a part of their formal education in schools such as The Brockville Seminary for Young Ladies, which in 1829 advertised that it taught 'Plain and ornamental needle work and embroidery in cotton, silk, worsted and chenille [sic]'. Even after they were married, needlework was a pastime that women continued, as illustrated in Jane Austen's 'Mansfield Park', where Lady Betram 'spent her days in sitting nicely dressed on a sofa, doing some long piece of needlework, of little use and no beauty'. Women would often work in the parlour or withdrawing room, storing their materials and tools in a small work table. Sources:
Minhinnick, Jeanne, "At Home in Upper Canada". Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto, 1983, p.20, 148.
Payne, Christopher, "Miller's Collecting Furniture". Reed International Books Limited, London, 1995, p.96.
Watkins, Susan, "Jane Austen's Town and Country Style". Rizzoli International Publications Inc., New York, 1990, p.21-2.
Hauteur : 75.50
Diamètre extérieur : 33.60
Unité de mesure linéaire : cm
Établissement : Campbell House Museum  Facebook-Campbell House Museum  Twitter-Campbell House Museum  YouTube-Campbell House Museum
Ville de l'établissement : Toronto
Province de l'établissement : Ontario

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